Washington NH Historical Society
Programs and Activities for 2021

All meetings at 7pm, via Zoom, unless otherwise noted.
Additional programs will be listed here soon!

Jan 11
New Hampshire Humanties Council Speaker
7pm Zoom Meeting: Music in My Pockets: Family Fun in Folk Music presented by Jeff Warner. Singing games, accessible "pocket instruments" like spoons and dancing puppets, tall tales, funny songs, old songs and songs kids teach each other in the playground - all "traditional" in that they have been passed down the generations by word of mouth will be performed and taught. It's a glimpse into how America amused itself before electricity. This program is recommended for adults and children ages 6 and above.

Jeff Warner connects 21st century audiences with the music and everyday lives of 19th century people. Warner accompanies his songs on concertina, banjo, guitar, and several pocket instruments, such as bones and spoons. He is a Folklorist and Community Scholar for the New Hampshire Council on the Arts and was a 2007 State Arts Council Fellow. He has toured nationally for the Smithsonian Institution and has recorded for Flying Fish, Rounder Records and other labels.

Feb 8
New Hampshire Humanties Council Speaker
7pm Zoom Meeting: Songs of Emigration: Storytelling Through Traditional Irish Music. Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution), sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War), and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki is an award-winning fiddler who grew up playing dances and folk festivals around New England. He was first recognized as part of New Hampshire's culture at the age of 12, when he was the youngest member of the delegation representing the state at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. He has toured nationally with bands in various genres, performed across Ireland, and released multiple recordings of Celtic music that can be heard on radio stations around New England. He currently performs over 200 shows each year, mostly with his own band, the Jordan TW Trio. His lifelong passion for history helps bring to life the traditional music around which he built his career.

Mar 8
New Hampshire Humanties Council Speaker
7pm Zoom Meeting: Wit and Wisdom in 19th Century New England. Whatever did New Englanders do on long winter evenings before cable, satellite and the internet? In the decades before and after the Civil War, our rural ancestors used to create neighborhood events to improve their minds. Community members male and female would compose and read aloud homegrown, handwritten literary "newspapers" full of keen verbal wit. Sometimes serious, sometimes sentimental but mostly very funny, these "newspapers" were common in villages across Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont and revealed the hopes, fears, humor and surprisingly daring behavior of our forebears. Jo Radner shares excerpts from her forthcoming book about hundreds of these "newspapers" and provides examples from villages in your region.

Jo Radner received her PhD from Harvard University. Before returning to her family home in western Maine as a freelance storyteller and oral historian, Radner spent 31 years as a professor at American University in Washington, DC. There she taught literature, folklore, women's studies, American studies, Celtic studies, and storytelling. She has published books and articles in all those fields, and is now writing a book titled Performing the Paper: Rural Self-Improvement in Northern New England, about a 19th-century village tradition of creating and performing handwritten literary newspapers. Radner is a past president of the American Folklore Society and the National Storytelling Network.

Apr 12
New Hampshire Humanties Council Speaker
7pm Zoom Meeting: The Connecticut: New England's Great River. The largest river in New England rises in a small beaver pond near the Canadian border and flows over 400 miles through four states, falling 2,670 feet to the sea through America's only watershed-based national fish and wildlife refuge. Adair Mulligan leads an armchair tour of this great river in New Hampshire and Vermont, exploring its history and natural beauty through the seasons and among the communities that have sprung up along its banks. Adair discusses how the river has influenced the lives of those who live there, and how they, in turn, have affected the river. Much more than a travelogue, this presentation explores the many issues involved in managing the health of this major river, and how citizens from all walks of life have created a vision for its future.

Adair Mulligan has a runaway curiosity about the natural and cultural history of northern New England. Author of The Gunstock Parish: A History of Gilford, New Hampshire, she has also contributed to Proud to Live Here in the Connecticut River Valley; Where the Great River Rises: An Atlas of the Upper Connecticut River; and Beyond the Notches: Stories of Place in New Hampshire's North Country. Executive Director of the Hanover Conservancy, she served for 20 years as Conservation Director of the Connecticut River Joint Commissions. Mulligan holds an MA degree from Smith College.